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Route and Flight Level added to View Flight page


UKV1121 - Chris Sutcliffe

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UKV1121 - Chris Sutcliffe

As a result of member feedback, I have added route and flight level to the flight information page.

 

For example: http://flyuk.aero/en/index.php?page=flight_view&flightinfo=7679

 

This means that you no longer need to book a flight just to view the route. We already display the routing on the map, so it makes sense to show the route as text in the table below as well.

 

This applies for Mainstream and Tour flight information pages.

 

Flight Info.PNG

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That's a great new feature and very welcome as I can choose and plan my next couple of flights in advance, with all details available.  

 

FUEL. Difficult to add fuel where a range of aircraft is available.

Really our pilots should be aware of the fuel requirements for their types if only based on miles range. It's not as if we pay for the stuff !  I certainly wouldn't be trusting her indoors to gas up my car and tell I've got 'plenty'. I've a fair idea of the range of my regular types and some mental arithmetic is enough to give me number, which I add a reserve to. 'Some' of out pilots seems to be fuel fixated.

It is always possible to re-fuel in flight if you get it wrong. As an occasional thing you are not going to get lashed to the mast and flogged within an inch of your licence. I routinely fuel to the brim and continue a series of shorter flights without refuelling at each stop. I get to handle the aircraft at Max T/O and landing weights like that. It does make a difference to your minimum speeds and manoeuvrability, but then I do actually fly holding the controls.

 

Just an extra note - do the real world planned diversion destinations simply cover those nearest the intended destination, or include a reduced range destination at 2/3rds distance 'just-in-case', possibly to 'Company' airports.

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Great new feature, funny thing happening on some pages where I cant copy the route using normal mouse select and copy.

 

Copying works fine on flights I selected in the mainstream category.. I'm able to select and copy routes and paste into my flight planner. When I tried the same thing for a Class A Tour flight (FLRIM07) I wasn't able to select any text on that page to copy. I tried other tour flights and got the same problem. Are those pages somehow protected from copying?

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We already get the fuel planning info, it's just that it doesn't print out. And so far it has been pretty acturate. You are right I could fly with full tanks(or unlimited fuel) but I could also fly direct from one airport to the other. But I try to fly acurately. Some of us do!

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UKV1197 - Derek Butterworth

If you just press Ctrl +P you get the Fuel on the printout as well, its just the script when you press the PRINT button that hasn't been updated yet

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Guest UKV1628 -

Great feature. Well done. Nice to see the route and info prior to booking when choosing which flight. I've always found fuel requirements to be pretty accurate on the site but tend to crosscheck them to make sure.

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Just an extra note - do the real world planned diversion destinations simply cover those nearest the intended destination, or include a reduced range destination at 2/3rds distance 'just-in-case', possibly to 'Company' airports.

 

Short answer is yes, the flight package from the dispatcher generally also includes enroute acceptable airports weather and notams with normal practice to get latest WX via ATIS or direct from airport while overflying as well alternate routes we called them escape routes in event of engine failure or failures say over mountainous regions.

 

As you mentioned Company airports are prefered but if circumstances require perhaps that last WX report you received 20 minutes ago might be your saving grace.

 

Regards,

 

Dave.

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UKV3375 - Vincent Pizzey

Very useful addition to the page.

 

As regards fuel planning, it would be useful to have specific data for each type, maybe as part of the aircraft download .I haven't found any readily available way of knowing how much fuel burn per hour (assume this depends on flight level, gross weight, distance etc), for every FlyUK aircraft, to be used in calculations to get the proper amount of fuel for any given flight.

 

I think fuel planning is a big mystery to new pilots.

 

I don't like to just have full tanks so I usually just guess and probably carry more fuel than necessary but sometimes have to resort to getting out the Jerry can from the crew locker though I dislike running out of fuel on the flight and usually slow down to save it in the hope of making the destination.

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UKV1372 - John Wheat

Vince, I use the figures provided in the CFP tab of the Flight Dispatch of a booked flight. They are usually pretty accurate (perhaps a tad generous). If ASN says I have a head or tail wind, I make minor adjustments accordingly.

 

I know that a lot of people go to great lengths to ensure accurate fuel load, to emulate real world. But for me, this is close enough (better than just filling the tanks) :)

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UKV3375 - Vincent Pizzey

Yes John I use that for scheduled flights but recently I've flown mostly Tour flights and a lot of tour flights don't seem to have the data in the Flight Despatch page and if they do it may not be aircraft specific. I just wonder if someone could produce a quick matrix of key data - a row for each FlyUK aeroplane and columns with burn per hour for say take-off and climb; cruise (I'm no expert as you can tell and presumably the burn would be different for different cruise altitudes/speeds?); approach; taxi.  From there it could be possible to estimate fuel required based on the flight plan distance/altitude.

 

The matrix could include whatever formula is used for diversion to alternate airport etc.

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UKV1372 - John Wheat

Sorry Vince, I misunderstood. There is a very good online tool at Simbrief.com, that produces flight plans including fuel data for whatever route and aircraft you choose. I think it even takes into account the weather, so it is pretty accurate. Again if I remember correctly you have to register to use it, but it is free.

Certainly worth a look.

 

Cheers

John

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UKV3375 - Vincent Pizzey

Thanks John that sounds worth a look. Also, I just realised FSX does a calculation (in the Flight Planner - Nav Log section) which changes according to the aircraft selected.I'll give that a test on my next flight to see how accurate it is...I haven't checked to see if it takes account altitude etc., though I suspect it will be simpler than that.

Cheers.

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Agree with John. The CFP is generally spot on, and usually calculates more or less (usually within a few %) what the Airbus fuel planner suggests.

 

Last time I flew into Heathrow on a default 737, I must have slightly miscalculated my fuel and my engines stopped exactly as I taxied off the runway!! Would have been knackered if I'd had to go around or divert!!

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Well, I've had some stick for saying you should be able to work it out for yourself.

Variations for headwind, lower flight levels, extra's for divert and so on are what the reserve is for, Fuel to divert plus a half hour to make up your mind (or wait for a slot) I think is the RW requirement, which came in very useful when that plane came down on the runway a few years back. Some waited, preferring the economies of landing as planned, but many had to divert anyway. If I remember right it was near a hundred arrivals already en-route, and I think 70 ended up orbiting in hope as one Runway was still active. About a third of them got down OK, the rest diverted.

Now on working it out for yourself there are three phases to a flight - T/O to Cruise altitude. Fairly constant. Cruise - fuel per 100nm x total trip distance. And descent and landing. If those three added together don't give you a pretty decent figure for each aircraft type then I'll be running lean for the taxi.

PS. Taking off on full fuel. Very useful on a series of the Highland Connection Flights. Fuelling adds time to the turnaround, which costs far more than the extra fuel burnt (if you want to get real).

PPS Recently at EGHI (the best airport in the world bar most) I saw all the Flybe aircraft turn off the terminal side engine as soon as they were on the taxiways. Safety or Fuel economy? If you want to get real try taxiing like that!

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Vincent - the CFP should give you what you need.  Inevitably it's based on an average for the type.  What you burn will depend on which model you are using (some are more accurate than others), which wx source and wx engine etc. Also how you fly it! A nice CDA with no holds, late flap and gear will all help.

 

If you want to do this about as well as we can in the FS world look at getting PFPX - it gives you full despatch sheets, alternate details etc etc etc.

 

Trevor - fuelling in smaller a/c will depend on the fuel deal each airline has at each airport and the type of route.  Fuelling rarely adds time, if you're unloading & loading baggage, pax, catering etc.  And if it's an ABCA route you may be able to fuel with pax on board (happened to me more than once).  Golden rule is dragging unnecessary fuel around the skies is acting like a petrol tanker for no reason and costs money. And yes shutting down one engine for taxi is quite common in both turboprops and sometimes jets - I've witnessed it while in the back countless times. Also some engines (I'm thinking turboprops) are best run at idle for a minute or two before shutdown. So doing one on the way in (normally the LH - the side with the doors/stairs) allows for disembarkation as soon as you're on the stand.  Taxiing on one engine is not that difficult, it's just not well simulated in FS (well FSX anyway - and I suspect even worse in older versions). As for EGHI? For wimps.  Try the sadly now closed EGHD (Plymouth) - frequent strong SW winds, low viz and a short runway. I've flown the Chipmunk (DHC-1 not the small stripy rodent...) from there and been 'cargo' in Dash7s, 8s, ATRs, Dauphins, Lynxes and Sea Kings  

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It's alright having data to hand but EVERY pilot should be able to work out fuel using calculations for his aircraft, especially if it's payware!

 

Sometimes fuel calculations can be wrong that the system provides. Having a read of the PMDG manuals has taught me the calculations and even thoug PFPX is 97.5% accurate I still calculate the fuel, A) to keep my knowledge and ability up-to-date and B) to ensure that the fuel given is correct.

 

Again, I think it comes down to the route of most things - it's down to how realistic each pilot wants to be.

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It's alright having data to hand but EVERY pilot should be able to work out fuel using calculations for his aircraft, especially if it's payware!

 

Sometimes fuel calculations can be wrong that the system provides. Having a read of the PMDG manuals has taught me the calculations and even thoug PFPX is 97.5% accurate I still calculate the fuel, A) to keep my knowledge and ability up-to-date and B) to ensure that the fuel given is correct.

 

Again, I think it comes down to the route of most things - it's down to how realistic each pilot wants to be.

Hi Craig

 

I have a little tutorial on Fuel Planning for the novice That I have just finished writing. I was going to send it to you for the next Magazine but I will send it now and let me know what you think

 

Mike

 

p.s.  It is written in Microsoft Word

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